MLK Week 2018 — Critical Reflections on Current Struggles

Monday, Jan. 15

Goods Drive: Drop off locations — LC Mall, ELC Cap Center and Evening Programs *Items to be collected: personal hygiene items, Cheerios, children's hats/mittens (new or gently used), school supplies (new or gently used)

Beloved Dinner: Community Dinner — Black Love as Empowerment and Resistance
5 p.m., Larison Hall
RSVP required. The link is forthcoming on the Message Center.

How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul — Eddie S. Glaude
7 p.m., ELC Forum

Eddie S. Glaude is a scholar who speaks to the black and blue in America. His muses include James Baldwin, Malcolm X, and Bobby “Blue” Bland. Glaude turns to African American literature in his writing and teaching for insight into African American political life, religious thought, gender and class.

Tuesday, Jan. 16

Goods Drive: Drop off locations — LC Mall, ELC Cap Center and Evening Programs *Items to be collected: personal hygiene items, Cheerios, children's hats/mittens (new or gently used), school supplies (new or gently used)

Lunch Conversation with Khalid Latif
Noon - 1 p.m., Walls Lounge
Please RSVP to griot@bucknell.edu

Rise Above Hate/I am Not What is Broken — Khalid Latif
7 p.m., ELC Forum

The NYU Islamic Center, headed by Khalid Latif, is a leader among American Muslim organizations and is uniquely shaped to contribute to the future of Muslim practice in the West. In 2007, Latif became the youngest chaplain in history of the New York City Police Department. He was 24. Since then, Latif has developed tremendously valuable skills as a spokesperson for co-existence, mutual understanding and productive relationships between cultures, communities and religions.

Wednesday, Jan. 17

Goods Drive: Drop off locations — LC Mall, ELC Cap Center and Evening Programs *Items to be collected: personal hygiene items, Cheerios, children's hats/mittens (new or gently used), school supplies (new or gently used)

Lunch Conversation with Raffi Freedman-Gurspan
Noon - 1 p.m., Walls Lounge
Please RSVP to griot@bucknell.edu

The Quest for Transgender Equality — Raffi Freedman-Gurspan
7 p.m., ELC Forum

Raffi Freedman-Gurspan is the Director of External Relations at the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE), where she oversees public education and field organizing operations. She was both a Senior Associate Director for Public Engagement, where she served as the primary liaison to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community, and Outreach and Recruitment Director for Presidential Personnel at the White House from 2015-2017. Freedman-Gurspan was the first openly transgender staffer to work at the White House. She also currently sits on the United States Holocaust Memorial Council as an appointee named by President Barack Obama.

Thursday, Jan. 18

Goods Drive: Drop off locations — LC Mall, ELC Cap Center and Evening Programs *Items to be collected: personal hygiene items, Cheerios, children's hats/mittens (new or gently used), school supplies (new or gently used)

“What is the Point of a Liberal Arts Education?” — Cornel West and Robert George
7 p.m., Weis Center

Professor West has a passion to invite a variety of people from all walks of life into his world of ideas in order to keep alive the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. — a legacy of telling the truth and bearing witness to love and justice. Robert P. George maintains that Martin Luther King, Jr. and other leaders of the Civil Rights Movement called upon us to be true to our best selves as Americans — to be true to our moral principles. West and George will discuss the purpose of a liberal arts education through the lens of King’s legacy and philosophy.

Sunday, Jan. 21

Goods Drive: Drop off locations — LC Mall, ELC Cap Center and Evening Programs *Items to be collected: personal hygiene items, Cheerios, children's hats/mittens (new or gently used), school supplies (new or gently used)

Interfaith Service for Peace and Justice
11 a.m., Rooke Chapel

Martin Luther King, Jr. said that his rationale for his Civil Rights work came from the Sermon on the Mount, and some of his methods came from Gandhi. Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel walked arm in arm with King across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The Civil Rights movement was an interfaith effort from its inception. The Interfaith Service for Peace and Justice brings together members of diverse faith communities from across the university to offer readings and reflections on the ways in which justice is lived out in their traditions. This occurs during the regular weekly worship service of the Rooke Chapel Congregation, which, for that day, serves a gathering place for those from all faith traditions.

Close

Places I've Been

The following links are virtual breadcrumbs marking the 27 most recent pages you have visited in Bucknell.edu. If you want to remember a specific page forever click the pin in the top right corner and we will be sure not to replace it. Close this message.