I think that you get so much out of your degree if you double major, especially at a liberal arts university. You get to explore your passions and do things you didn't think were possible.

Amber McDonnell '17

Amber will work in global technology operations for Bank of America Merrill Lynch in Charlotte, N.C.

Congratulations, Amber!

"I knew when I visited Bucknell my first year of high school for swimming state championships that I wanted to come here. As soon as I received my letter of acceptance, I knew there was nowhere else I would rather go.

"Coming into Bucknell, I had the idea that economics would be a great major because I was naturally interested in the topic and I had done very well in AP micro and macro economics in high school. It wasn't until I took a theatre class to fulfill a humanities requirement for the College Core Curriculum (CCC) that I found my second major. I ended up liking it so much that I didn't want to stop taking theatre classes.  

"What I like about studying both economics and theatre is that they compliment each other so well. I get to use both sides of my brain. In theatre there are no wrong answers; it is very creative. Very often in economics there is only one right answer; it is very analytical and straightforward. I think I like them both so much because they are so different. I go to my Marxism course, where everyone discusses the same question, and then I go to Costume Design where I can create something no one else has thought of. I think that you get so much out of your degree if you double major, especially at a liberal arts university. You get to explore your passions and do things you didn't think were possible.  

"Since I started last summer, I have been able to use my interdisciplinary skills doing research with Professor Knoedler in the economics department. We are creating a series of Geographic Information System (GIS) maps for a new senior seminar course called American Economic History. The course will include labs where students can use these maps to understand how different demographics shape the economy of a time period. For example, there is a map of slave populations in the South and students can learn how the population affected the industry booms of agriculture and manufacturing as opposed to the same factors in the North. Since I helped build the technology behind the class, I will get to both take the class and be a teaching assistant when the class premiers next semester."    

Amber is from Lancaster, Pa.

Posted November 19, 2015

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